Change Comes to the Corner of Sandy and 24th

Tres Shannon’s Portland P Palace. From the website.

Change is coming to the quiet corner of NE Sandy Boulevard and 24th starting with a new concept from Portland’s donut King, Tres Shannon. This will soon be joined by Portland’s developer/rockstar Kevin Cavenaugh’s latest project, the Ocean, and the Glee Apartments from developer Mark Madden and Young Design Studio. This leads me to speculate as to whether this will be enough to start changing people’s perception of Sandy from simple an arterial to drive on to street worthy of driving to.

A recent profile of Tres Shannon in the Willamette Week discussed his new venture, Portland P Palace. In the shell of a former auto service center Tres is creating a fun house of all things P: putt-putt, ping-pong, pool, pizza, perogies, etc. His Voodoo donuts has turned a humble and economical pastry into a thing worthy of a pilgrimage to Portland. I go to school near the original and every day there are people lined up to buy donuts. In a way it can be credited with helping to put Ankeny Alley on Portland’s map. He seems to have a knack for creating excitement and hype going back to the X-Ray Cafe. I expect his latest venture to be nothing less due to the fact that like Voodoo it promises to be truly unique.

The Ocean. Plan from permit application.

Kevin Cavenaugh’s project on the same block, The Ocean, was detailed in a recent article by the DCJ. He is transforming a former auto dealership into space for several micro-restaurants, a bakery and a residence that I believe is for him and his family. The permit application to the city can be found here. In the book, Cartopia: Portland’s Foodcart Revolution, Kevin discusses with the authors the “ocean” of space that exists between conventional restaurants and foodcarts and how that is where he wants to swim.  I am glad to see he is making that vision a reality. In Portland commercial development the concept of micro-retail has not been explored. With the economy what it is and the explosion of food carts it is not surprising that someone is seeking to exploit this niche. He also seems to be doing what many successful place-making developers, such as Adaptive on Williams  Avenue and Project^ in the Black Box Building have done and been very intentional in the selection of tenants. According to eaterpdx.com the project will feature a burger only concept from the people behind Slow Bar, a storefront version of the food cart Pie Spot, and a meat ball based concept from the owner of Tabla on NE 28th. All restaurants worth a special trip to check out.

Glee Apartment. From the permit application.

The other project taking shape is the Glee apartment as covered in the DJC’s Daily Blog. The project is slated for the southwest corner of NE 24th and Glisan. It is a 3 story 32 unit apartment building with one 500 square foot commercial space and no automobile parking. The permit application can be viewed here. The project is designed by Young Design Studio. The developer is Mark Madden, a rather prolific actor in Portland as of late being behind projects in various stages throughout the city including Overton Building (completed) and Freedom Center apartments (under construction) in the Pearl and the new Miss apartment proposed for Mississippi, all by Fosler Architects.

The interesting thing about these project and what makes them worth writing about is that they all seem to share a similar independent spirit and collectively could create a node of activity from which urban life can grow. New destination restaurants, a bar/spectacle and new residents can alter the perception of an area. As we saw on Alberta, Williams and other evolving areas in Portland, all it took was two or three buildings in close proximity being adaptively reused by thoughtful developers and carefully stocked with a good mix tenants to create a place worthy of visiting. From this small node growth can spread in multiple directions creating a larger mass of activity and spurring a virtuous cycle of redevelopment. Sandy, like Interstate should be a great street due to its role as a key connector in the city, linking the central city to many of the neighborhoods in Northeast. Like other areas in the city, inner Sandy has geography as an advantage: it is close to downtown, it is close to numerous thriving neighborhood and areas such as 28th and lower Burnside that have already been experiencing a renaissance. I have also notice a lot of under the radar activity in the industrial zone north of Sandy in the form of warehouses like the Bison Building that once house machine shops and now house media and design firms. All this could add together to create a Sandy that is very different form the one we know today.

What next for Sandy?

UPDATE: Sadly Portland P Palace is not to be due to unanticipated complications. Too bad.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Change Comes to the Corner of Sandy and 24th

  1. Why did you say Young Design Studio may or may not still exist. Any responsible reporter would simply make the call to the firm and ask, “do you still exist?” before publishing misleading comments. I know for a fact that they still exist. Irresponsible reporting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s